British Super League with Celtic and Rangers joining Premier League's top 16 teams will NOT happen


REVEALED: A ‘British Super League’ – with Celtic and Rangers joining the Premier League’s top 16 teams – will NOT happen because clubs would not want to increase their own risk of relegation by voting for four to leave the top flight

  • Plans for a British Super League follow fallout from the European Super League 
  • The top English clubs remain committed to a reform of the Premier League 
  • Man United and Liverpool drafted Project Big Picture plans last October
  • However, Celtic and Rangers joining the British Super League will not happen

Plans for a British Super League involving Celtic and Rangers will not progress any further, Sportsmail understands.

The latest development follows talk that the two Scottish giants were wanted to join a British Super League after the eye-watering fall-out from the European Super League debacle that created a civil war within the game.

But despite those plans coming to a shuddering halt, clubs remain committed to a reform of the Premier League following the publication in October of the contentious Project Big Picture proposals drafted by Liverpool and Manchester United.

Scottish giants Celtic and Rangers have been wanted to join a British Super League

Scottish giants Celtic and Rangers have been wanted to join a British Super League

And the latest proposal has been to allow Old Firm rivals Celtic and Rangers to join the Premier League’s top 16 teams.

However, Sportsmail understands the idea is unlikely to ever progress with the Premier League’s ‘other 14’ clubs unwilling to vote for a move that would risk their place at the top table.

Following the Project Big Picture plans at the end of last year, Premier League chief executive Richard Masters agreed to a ‘strategic review’ of the competition’s future focusing on ‘competition structure, calendar, governance and financial sustainability’.

In addition to the Rangers and Celtic plan, another option that has been considered is to introduce an end of season play-off competition, similar to that in rugby union and rugby league. 

Premier League clubs are unwilling to raise their risk of relegation by voting four teams out

Premier League clubs are unwilling to raise their risk of relegation by voting four teams out

The top clubs have been pushing for a reduction to an 18-team league that was envisaged at the outset of the competition three decades ago.

Talk of a British Super League has emerged after the quick death of the European Super League, which the English top-flight’s Big Six were all founding members of originally.

The 12 founding members – which also included Barcelona, Real Madrid, Atletico Madrid, Juventus, AC Milan and Inter – came in for fierce backlash from across Europe, with fans, media and even politicians protesting against the breakaway tournament.

And following the suspension of the ill-fated European venture, the Premier League backlash against the Big Six rebels began on Wednesday with representatives of the clubs kicked out of key positions within the league.

Richard Masters pledged a 'strategic review' of the Premier League after Project Big Picture

Richard Masters pledged a ‘strategic review’ of the Premier League after Project Big Picture

The organisation will also use their position of power to demand the rebel clubs recommit to the top flight’s existing structure and collective approach to TV rights sales as the price for their aborted attempt to join the European Super League.

In the first punishments, the Big Six will be stripped of their positions on key committees and working groups, with Masters asking their representatives to step down on Wednesday.

On a day when supporters’ groups also demanded change in the leadership of their clubs, Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck suffered further embarrassment when he was told to relinquish his position on the Premier League’s nominations and remuneration committee where he had been a key lieutenant to former executive chairman Richard Scudamore.

Manchester City chief executive Ferran Soriano and Arsenal’s Vinai Venkatesham have been taken off the Club Strategic Advisory Group which has been tasked with a strategic review.

The Premier League are also seeking the removal of Liverpool’s Tom Werner and Manchester United chief Ed Woodward from the Broadcast Advisory Group. 

Liverpool, run by John W Henry (left), had been behind the Project Big Picture proposals

Liverpool, run by John W Henry (left), had been behind the Project Big Picture proposals

Man United and the Glazers (Joel is pictured above) were working with Liverpool on the plans

Man United and the Glazers (Joel is pictured above) were working with Liverpool on the plans

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