Eco spirit is greater in OLDER Britons, study shows 


We’re the silver greens: Eco spirit is greater in OLDER Britons as they are much more likely to do their bit for the environment, study shows

  • Older adults are more likely to do their bit for the environment, a study shows
  • The study also found that most of us say we have become more conscious of the environment and that our lifestyles have become greener during the pandemic
  • But young people appear to have forgotten good green habits over lockdown
  • Evidence of neglect of environmentally-responsible behaviour among the young follows the shameful scenes in parks across the country this week 

They may not be so keen to parade their green credentials or join environmental protests.

But older adults are much more likely than the young to do their bit for the environment, according to a study.

It found that most of us say we have become more conscious of the environment and that our lifestyles have become greener during the pandemic.

But millions of young people have forgotten their pledges to recycle rubbish, stop buying single-use plastic, or eat local and seasonal food over months of lockdowns and restrictions.

Evidence of neglect of environmentally-responsible behaviour among the young follows the shameful scenes in parks across the country this week following the lifting of lockdown curbs on open-air gatherings. 

A popular Nottingham park was yet again covered in huge amounts of litter after a late-night party.At least 200 people gathered at the Forest Recreation Ground, March 31. According to a study, But older adults are much more likely to do their bit for the environment

A popular Nottingham park was yet again covered in huge amounts of litter after a late-night party.At least 200 people gathered at the Forest Recreation Ground, March 31. According to a study, But older adults are much more likely to do their bit for the environment

Public spaces have been left carpeted with litter and rubbish by large groups of youngsters who had congregated to drink and celebrate.

The report from insurance and investment firm Aviva said: ‘More than half of UK residents say the Covid pandemic has made them more environmentally conscious, but their actions tell a different story. 

‘Over-55s generally take more green actions than other age groups, particularly under-25s.’

The report, based on surveys carried out by Censuswide Research among more than 4,000 people, said two out of three over-55s were committed to recycling.

This compared with 36 per cent of those aged between 25 and 34, and only 26 per cent of those under 24. 

Even in a time of severe curbs on travel, fewer people say they are cutting back on using cars or planes than before the pandemic. 

But a third of over-55s were prepared to cut down on car use, more than double the rate among under-24s.

Among all age groups, the proportion using bin recycling collections dropped from 73 per cent at the end of 2019 to 51 per cent in February this year. 

The percentage avoiding single-use plastic fell from 61 to 36, eating local or seasonal vegetables from 37 to 25, and intending to become vegan from 5 to 4.

Those promising to cut car use fell from a third to a quarter, and those saying they would fly less dropped from 22 to 17 per cent.

It comes as the Daily Mail is helping to launch Keep Britain Tidy’s Great British Spring Clean campaign, asking readers to help restore pride in our country.

You can pledge your support for the national litter-picking effort, which takes place between May 28 and June 13, on Keep Britain Tidy’s website.

PPE litter is killing animals

Researchers have highlighted disturbing accounts of dead or dying animals to warn of the impact of PPE not being disposed of properly.

They include a dead fish trapped in a glove and a bird with its wings entangled in a mask.

Animals ranging from hedgehogs in the UK to monkeys in Malaysia are getting caught up in coronavirus-related detritus, the Dutch biologists found. A penguin in Brazil was found dead on a beach with a face mask in its stomach.

‘Both masks and gloves pose a risk of entanglement, entrapment and ingestion,’ said the researchers, whose findings have been published in the scientific journal Animal Biology. 

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