How to dress like a grown up with Shane Watson: The shoes that go with everything? Clever clogs!  


There are no statistics for sales of clogs since the start of the pandemic, but anecdotal evidence suggests that the women of Britain went clog crazy during the lockdowns.

I got a pair. My friend got a pair. My neighbour got black ones and someone I work with ordered hers in shiny gold.

Clogs, which have been edging up the fashion charts for more than a year, became the ideal footwear for the moment. Solid. Simple. Comforting and comfortable. In my opinion, the feeling of bare feet on a wooden clog base beats an air-cushioned trainer sole and a Birkenstock cork bed (the other footwear that took off like a rocket last year).

Also clogs, if you remember them well from the 1970s, come with a warm rush of just the right sort of nostalgia; the sort that makes you smile and remember toe socks and denim skirts and corduroy loons and embroidered denim dungarees without the faintest wince of regret.

Shane Watson shares advice for styling and embracing this season's clogs trend and said they are can be paired with pretty midaxi dresses and jumpsuits (Pictured: Alexa Chung wearing clogs)

Shane Watson shares advice for styling and embracing this season’s clogs trend and said they are can be paired with pretty midaxi dresses and jumpsuits (Pictured: Alexa Chung wearing clogs)

They are the lovable fashion heroes of our teen years which you can wear now and look just as good — and you can’t say the same for gold lamé platforms.

And the best news: as of this spring, fashion has refallen in love with clogs and declared them the footwear of the hour. All the top designers — Hermes and Celine, Gucci and Stella McCartney — included them in their summer collections (a first as far as we know).

Clogs were shown on the catwalk with everything from shimmering black dresses to shorts, and can now command handbag prices (£680, if you’re talking about Celine’s). That’s part of the fun, too. Everyone can join in this look, no matter what their age or budget.

Naturally, you can’t beat the Swedish classics, either Swedish Hasbeens (£98, footway.com) or the ones I’ve got by Lotta in oiled tan nubuck (£39.50, lottafromstockholm.co.uk).

Sandgrens Swedish clogs have rivets rather than staples on the front if you prefer (£85, etsy.com) and World of Clogs does a cheaper traditional Swedish clog in red, yellow and gold (£29.95, worldofclogs.com) — though the rubber sole is heavier, and these details matter with clogs.

British style expert reveals a selection of designer brands stocking the trend including Stella McCartney and Hermes (pictured: a Hermes model walking the catwalk in clogs for Spring/Summer 2021 show)

British style expert reveals a selection of designer brands stocking the trend including Stella McCartney and Hermes (pictured: a Hermes model walking the catwalk in clogs for Spring/Summer 2021 show)

Clogs with heels are definitely a thing this season with Stella McCartney showing white, chunky, high-heeled clogs with puffy jumpsuits and little dresses (Pictured: Laura Whitmore wearing high-heeled clogs to a Back To The Future II screening)

Clogs with heels are definitely a thing this season with Stella McCartney showing white, chunky, high-heeled clogs with puffy jumpsuits and little dresses (Pictured: Laura Whitmore wearing high-heeled clogs to a Back To The Future II screening) 

I’m not sure why you’d want clogs in any colour other than tan or black or, at a push, khaki, but you might, and metallic finishes and horse-bit details are big for spring.

Penelope Chilvers’ black horse-bit style is extra smart for the person who likes their clogs polished (£159, penelopechilvers.com), though if heading down the decorative route, I’d go for the tan, oiled suede style with a grosgrain military stripe trim (£159, penelopechilvers.com).

As for clogs with heels, they’re definitely a thing this season — Stella McCartney showed white, chunky, high- heeled clogs with puffy jumpsuits and little dresses. The message is: if you want to dress up and wear a heel, make it a wooden mule.

CLOGS: THE NEW RULES 

  • Keep the base wooden.
  • Tan is classic, black and khaki are also safe bets.  
  • Wear with bare legs.  
  • This year, clogs go with suits, dresses, everything. 

All the Swedish brands do clogs with heels — high and medium — and if you’re interested in a platform, there are plenty of those, too.

Just be sure they’re comfortable, because that’s very much the point. Fitflop’s platform clogs would be a good place to start (£120, fitflop.com).

There are endless clog variations, including ones with slingbacks and open toes. Each to their own, but if you’re going to go off-message, you’re probably safest with peep-toe sandals from Swedish Hasbeen (£96, footway.com).

They’ve been around for several summers (Sarah Jessica Parker rarely wears anything else once the temperature warms up) and work well with dresses and skirts if you want something more feminine.

How are you going to wear your clogs? Well, not all the time. Not on a bicycle, for example. I don’t like to drive in them or walk very far, but they’re the perfect at-home shoe to wear with anything, and are set to be summer’s laid- back accompaniment to pretty midaxi dresses and jumpsuits, as well as providing the finishing touch to your upgraded 2021 Linda McCartney look.

This is the part I’m excited about: a denim skirt and clogs; wide-legged jeans and clogs; a midaxi dress and clogs — Linda’s 1970s greatest hits, revisited. I’m particularly looking forward to the denim skirt look, plus a wide-lapelled blazer or even a tank top; boots would make it smart, clogs will make it fun and perfect for the upbeat mood we’re in.

Like we said, clogs make everyone happy.

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