‘Petty’ Macron ripped apart after praising US vaccine rollout but staying silent about UK


The europhile French President has been accused of ignoring the success of the UK’s jab rollout while trying to cover up his own failures. But his slight was quickly picked up by a leading academic, who rightly pointed out his glaring double standards.

Professor Alan Sked, formerly of the London School of Economics, said: “Macron has condemned the EU’s failure to have an ambitious vaccination programme while praising that of the USA.

“Ours, of course, has been even more ambitious but he couldn’t bear to mention it. Petty not just petit. Contemptible really.”

According to the latest data, the UK had vaccinated over three times as many as France.

Britain has also vaccinated a higher percentage of its population than the US, statistics show.

READ MORE: EU vaccine claims questioned by BBC after AstraZeneca attacks

The row erupted after Mr Macron spoke to a Greek TV channel ERT about the vaccine roll out.

The 43-year-old politician said that the 27-member bloc had been “wrong” to act slowly and to “lack ambition” in pushing forward with plans for Covid inoculations.

Mr Macron said: ”Everybody, all the experts said: never in the history of mankind was a vaccine developed in less than a year.

“We didn’t shoot for the stars. That should be a lesson for all of us.

“We were wrong to lack ambition, to lack the madness I would say, to say: It’s possible, let’s do it.”

He then pointed favourably to the faster strategy adopted in the US, which he said was a plan to “pull out all the stops and do it”.

So far the US has fully vaccinated 49 million people out of a population of 331 million.

But he missed out the UK – whose programme has given more than 29 million people at least one jab – equating to nearly half the population.

The news emerged as an 11th hour deal between the EU and UK managed to avoid sparking a trade war.

In a spiteful attempt to distract from its calamitous vaccine rollout, the EU threatened to block exports of vaccines to countries including the UK.

It came after the EU accused Anglo-Swedish manufacturer AstraZeneca of not honouring contracts.

AstraZeneca denies the allegations.

Elements of the AstraZeneca vaccination are manufactured in a number of EU states and exported to third countries including the UK.

Mrs von der Leyen said the firm must “catch up” on deliveries to the EU before exporting doses elsewhere.

This led to accusations, from the UK and the World Health Organization (WHO) among others, of vaccine nationalism.

In response, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned that “blockades” were not “sensible”.

To prevent the argument escalating further, the EU and UK issued a joint statement pledging to work together.



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