Prince Charles' friend Alan Titchmarsh says work royal has done for this country is 'self-evident'


Alan Titchmarsh has defended Prince Charles in wake of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey.

The gardener, 71, who counts the Queen among his fans, hailed the Prince of Wales the ‘hardest working man he knows’ and said the impact the royal has had on this country is ‘self-evident’ 

He has been close to the heir to the throne for years and the pair have collaborated on several TV and radio shows highlighting the environmental benefits of gardening after bonding over their love of nature. 

Appearing on Good Morning Britain today, the presenter said he could only judge Charles, 72, ‘as he knows him’ rather than any impression given by his family.

Alan Titchmarsh has defended Prince Charles in wake of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey. The pair are pictured at the Chelsea flower show in 2002

Alan Titchmarsh has defended Prince Charles in wake of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey. The pair are pictured at the Chelsea flower show in 2002

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex shook the Firm to its core following their explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey, in which they made claims of racism within the royal family and alleged concerns about Meghan's mental health were ignored

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex shook the Firm to its core following their explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey, in which they made claims of racism within the royal family and alleged concerns about Meghan’s mental health were ignored

‘I wouldn’t comment on the interview at all, except to say the Prince of Wales, the work he has done for this country, the work he has done for the youth of this country with the Prince’s Trust, with the Prince’s Youth Business Trust is self-evident,’ he explained. 

‘If you look at what he’s achieved during his life, we need to value that as well. It’s very easy to judge other people on their family, but we don’t know the inside stories in all these families.  

‘It’s far better to judge people as we know them and my knowledge of the Prince of Wales is an incredibly hard working man, hardest working man I know, who has achieved so much in his life and I value his input into our society enormously.’ 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex shook the Firm to its core following their explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey, in which they made claims of racism within the royal family and alleged that concerns about Meghan’s mental health were ignored.  

He hailed the Prince of Wales the 'hardest working man he knows' and said the impact the royal has had on this country is 'self-evident'

He hailed the Prince of Wales the ‘hardest working man he knows’ and said the impact the royal has had on this country is ‘self-evident’

Alan, who received an MBE in 2000, spoke out in an interview with The Mirror, saying: ‘I feel for him a lot.’

‘I think it’s sad he’s had to be put through what he’s been put through, but he’s got enough people, I hope, who value what he does and who can see what he does and can field for him.’ 

Alan previously vowed he would boycott Netflix series The Crown in solidarity with Charles, accusing the royal drama of ‘playing with people’s lives’ and fearing viewers would believe the show is entirely factual.   

The latest series begins as the 1970s are drawing to a close, with the Royal Family preoccupied with safeguarding the line of succession by securing an appropriate bride for Prince Charles, who is still unmarried at 30.  

He has been close to the heir to the throne for years and the pair have collaborated on several TV and radio shows highlighting the environmental benefits of gardening after bonding over their love of nature. They are pictured in 2012 on ITV's The Royal Restoration

He has been close to the heir to the throne for years and the pair have collaborated on several TV and radio shows highlighting the environmental benefits of gardening after bonding over their love of nature. They are pictured in 2012 on ITV’s The Royal Restoration

It shows Charles meeting and marrying an innocent Diana while maintaining his affair with the then-married Camilla Parker-Bowles. 

Elsewhere, scenes showing Diana gorging on food before vomiting into a toilet are so graphic that they carry on-screen warnings.

The show faced widespread criticism over its ‘twisted’ depiction of the Royal Family, which portrays Prince Charles as callous and self-serving and his mother the Queen as cold.

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden demanded in November last year that Netflix make clear the royal drama is ‘fiction’. 

He claimed viewers should be warned at the start of each episode that it was not ‘fact’ after mounting concern that fabricated scenes in the drama series were so damaging to the Royal Family.

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden demanded in November last year that Netflix make clear the royal drama is 'fiction'. Pictured, Corrin and O'Connor as Charles and Diana in The Crown

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden demanded in November last year that Netflix make clear the royal drama is ‘fiction’. Pictured, Corrin and O’Connor as Charles and Diana in The Crown

‘It’s a beautifully produced work of fiction, so as with other TV productions, Netflix should be very clear at the beginning it is just that,’ he told The Mail on Sunday. 

‘Without this, I fear a generation of viewers who did not live through these events may mistake fiction for fact.’   

Controversy over invented scenes prompted the Princess’s brother to add his voice to the calls for a disclaimer.

Earl Spencer told ITV: ‘It would help The Crown an enormous amount if at the beginning of each episode it stated that, ‘This isn’t true but is based around some real events’. Because then everyone would understand it’s drama for drama’s sake.’ 

Emma Corrin, who plays Princess Diana, has previously admitted that the controversial fourth series is ‘fictionalised to a great extent’.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.